The American College of the Building Arts

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General Education Programs

General Education courses at ACBA consist of traditional liberal arts and sciences classes such as math, English, science, and history. Because of the special focus of the American College of the Building Arts, these classes go beyond the basic requirements of each field and make a special effort to demonstrate relationships and connections within the Building Arts. For example, problems in the math or science classes are often based on real problems within the Craft Specialization. History requirements at ACBA are met through a two-semester course called Architecture and Society which focuses on Architectural History, while not neglecting much of what is normally taught in a Western Civilization course.

ACCT301 - Principles of Accounting (fall, 3 credits)

This is the first course in the Business track. It introduces students to accounting principles and general theories of business management.

ARHS101 - Architecture and Society I (fall, 3 credits)

Introduction to architectural history: surveys the history of world architecture up to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on historical style periods and their relationship to cultural and technological development of each period. This course also emphasizes the artistic elements which characterize each period through intrinsic analysis and study of historically significant structures.

ARHS102 - Architecture and Society II (spring, 3 credits)

Introduction to architectural history: surveys the history of world architecture from the Renaissance to the early Twenty-first Century. Emphasis is placed on historical style periods and their relationship to cultural and technological development of each period. This course also emphasizes the artistic elements which characterize each period through intrinsic analysis and study of historically significant structures.
Prerequisite: ARHS101

BALE402 - Senior Seminar on Leadership (spring, 3 credits)

A senior seminar team-taught by ACBA faculty, the chief academic officer, and the President of the College, the leadership course focuses on the challenge of leadership from many different points of view, including several academic disciplines, the law, business, and the military. Emphasis is placed on helping students explore their own attitudes toward leadership and develop their own leadership style as they prepare for graduation and the opportunities which will follow.

BCST201 - Building Construction (fall, 3 credits)

Building Construction will introduce students to a variety of building systems proceeding from the generally introduced to the further detailed. The course will present a general overview of contemporary as well as traditional examples of building materials and methods of construction and their applications. Topics will include the material characteristics of building enclosure and structural systems, case studies in traditional and modern construction, and properties of building materials.

BMGT302 - Business/Construction Management (spring, 3 credits)

This is the second course in the Business track. All phases of business management within a construction project will be explored. Additionally, this course introduces students to general theories of construction management and then applies those theories specifically to the principles and practices of construction management. All phases of construction management will be explored. Specific topics may include: blueprint specifications, statistics, safety, contracts and legal issues, estimating, scheduling, project management, labor relations, permits and licensing, liability, insurance and ethics. All students will be required to complete a business plan as part of the coursework.

COMM201 - Communications (spring, 3 credits)

Building upon the firm foundation of Literature and Composition I and II, students learn to successfully navigate many types of public presentations – from formal speeches to informal debates and discussions.
Prerequisite: ENGL102

ENGL101 - Literature and Composition I (fall, 3 credits)

The course introduces the student to the Western Literary Canon beginning with mythology and progressing through the Renaissance. Composition is based on Classical Rhetoric and focuses on argumentative writing with some creative writing as well. Research methods are introduced towards the end of the term.

ENGL102 - Literature and Composition II (spring, 3 credits)

The course continues the study of the Western Literary Canon beginning with the Enlightenment and moving into the present day. Composition is based on Classical Rhetoric and focuses on research and analysis with some creative writing as well.
Prerequisite: ENGL101

HSPR201 - Historic Preservation Philosophy and Practice (fall, 3 credits)

This course focuses on the history and practice of preservation with an emphasis on practical and technical knowledge in preservation. Discussions focus on the continuing dialogue concerning preservation, restoration and conservation of historic building fabric in the United States. Other issues include social aspects of preservation and the implications of legal and political policies.
Prerequisite: ARHS102

LANG101 - Foreign Language I (spring, 3 credits)

Foreign Language 101 is the first semester of a language course for beginning students that will introduce basic grammar and provide a foundation of commonly used vocabulary for the Building Arts. Students will learn about the culture of the foreign language-speaking countries, including aspects of art and architecture. Students will begin developing communication competency in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing through assignments given inside and outside of class.

LANG102 - Foreign Language II (fall, 3 credits)

Foreign Language 102 builds upon the concepts introduced in the 101 course. The format will be similar to 101 with the same balanced focus on grammar, vocabulary, and culture implemented into activities based in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The approach to grammar will be more detailed.
Prerequisite: LANG101

LANG201 - Foreign Language III (spring, 3 credits)

In Foreign Language 201, an intermediate course of study, students are challenged by more sophisticated grammatical structures than in the introductory level courses. The intricacies of grammar are examined, and students study such constructs as reflexive verbs, double object pronouns, and the past tense. They will continue to foster their knowledge of high-frequency vocabulary in the Craft Specializations, and of more specialized terminology for the business and community environments. At this level, students will be expected to produce language through writing and speaking as much as receiving information through reading and listening.
Prerequisite: LANG102

MATH101 - Number Systems and Algebra (fall, 3 credits)

This course covers number systems, number properties and representations, essential algebraic concepts, functions and basic problem solving of linear and quadratic equations.

MATH102 - Geometry and Trigonometry (spring, 3 credits)

This course covers analytic geometry concepts and trigonometry, including applications and the use of graphing calculators.
Prerequisite: MATH101

SCME201 - Building Materials and Scientific Methods I (fall, 3 credits)

This course seeks to instill in students an appreciation of science and how a scientific approach can help them in many aspects of their life and work. It delves deeply into scientific approaches to understanding the world. Students learn how scientists think, develop ideas, discover, experiment, analyze and interpret data, draw and communicate conclusions, and they learn to do likewise. Throughout the course, students use the scientific method to solve problems and to understand how the scientific method applies to all scientific disciplines and endeavors as well as other disciplines and settings. The course also introduces students to a variety of science topics, skills and ideas. Students will have the opportunity to explore multiple scientific fields through research, thought, and discussion

SCME202 - Building Materials and Scientific Methods II (spring, 3 credits)

This course focuses on understanding the physical and chemical properties and sciences of traditional building materials, including hard- and soft-woods, igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and stone, clay brick, plaster, mortars, cements, gypsum, iron and related materials. Students will develop hypotheses and experiments, carry out experiments, perform analyses and calculations, interpret results, and draw and share conclusions as part of gaining an understanding of the nature of the materials they and their colleagues use in their crafts.
Prerequisites: SCME201

SSCI201 - Social Sciences (spring, 3 credits)

Topics for the Social Sciences course will be drawn from the following areas: Anthropology, Economics, Ethics, Philosophy, Political Science, and/or Sociology. A specific course description will be provided to students via the course syllabus.



Craft Specialization Support Courses

The curriculum at ACBA provides for a core of courses (four for the A.A.S. and six for the B.A.S.) that include Architectural Computer Graphics, Architectural Drawing and Drafting I and II, Architectural Design Studio I and II (for the B.A.S. degree), and Documenting and Researching Historic Buildings.

ARCG201 - Architectural Computer Graphics (fall, 3 credits)

This course builds on the hand drafting skills learned in ARDD and translates them to the computer. Students will learn how to draw using AutoCAD and Sketch Up and how to print completed drawings in order to communicate their design ideas with architects and other building artisans. Topics covered will include architectural scale, proportion, orthographic projections, drawing composition, line weights and plotting.

ARDD101 - Architectural Drawing and Drafting I (fall, 3 credits)

The student develops fundamental disciplines needed to communicate using two and three-dimensional drafting and freehand drawing. These skills will be used extensively in the building arts majors to express design concepts to professors, clients or colleagues in the limited to, proportion, geometric and orthographic construction, linear sketching.

ARDD102 - Architectural Drawing and Drafting II (spring, 3 credits)

The student develops fundamental disciplines needed to communicate using freehand drawing. These skills will be used extensively in the building arts majors to express design concepts to professors, clients or colleagues in the building community. Subjects covered include methods and methology including but not limited to perspective sketching and linear drawing, proportion, drawing from the cast, drawing the human form, and still life.
Prerequisite: ARDD101

ARDS301 - Architectural Philosophy and Principles (fall, 3 credits)

Explore fundamental concepts of architecture and the communication of design through drawing and linguistic skills practiced by architects/designers, as well as the interpretation and creation of these drawings by the building artisan. Case studies are utilized to examine these concepts.
Prerequisite: ARDD102

ARDS302 - Architectural Design Studio (spring, 3 credits)

Explore concepts of architecture and the communication of design. Students expand upon the drawing and linguistic skills previously explored in ARDS301 and begin learning how computers can assist in presenting and reading building concepts. This course provides a broad understanding of the tools a building artisan needs to visually communicate designs with client or employer.
Prerequisite: ARDS301

HSPR202 - Documenting and Researching Historic Buildings (spring, 3 credits)

This course is an introduction to research methods relative to historic preservation. The focus is on different research methologies, types of resources, tools for assessing information, evaluating/analyzing sources/content and presentation of findings. The primary product of this course will be a conservation report and measured drawings of a selected building.
Prerequisites: ENGL102, HSPR201



Craft Specialization Programs

A.A.S. and B.A.S. students complete the course work required for the degree sought. Additionally, portfolios of their classwork are required. The B.A.S. curriculum culminates in the Capstone course, which integrates the general education coursework with that of the Craft Specialization in order to provide the student with a final portfolio that synthesizes the theoretical and hands-on experiences and knowledge imparted by the ACBA curriculum.

BCAP401 - Building Arts Capstone I (fall, 3 credits)

The Capstone course is designed for seniors to demonstrate their mastery over the entire ACBA curriculum and their readiness for graduation. During the spring semester students execute the project they proposed in the fall. In addition to a portfolio and completed built works, students will be evaluated on Professionalism. All three components must be demonstrated to pass this course.

BCAP402 - Building Arts Capstone II (spring, 3 credits)

This course is designed to allow students to demonstrate their mastery over the entire ACBA curriculum and their readiness for graduation. During the spring semester of the senior year, students execute the project proposed in the fall. In addition to a finished project and complete portfolio, students will be evaluated on the entire process (panning, time management and communication skills).
Prerequisites: BCAP401

INTR101, INTR201, INTR301 - Building Arts Summer Internship I, II, II (summer, 2 credits)

Students put the skills they have learned into practice in structured work environments for a minimum of 8 weeks in summer internships with qualified building companies. This educational and career development experience is integral to a student’s portfolio design, development and assessment. Internships are coordinated by the student and the Craft Specialization instructor and follows policies and procedures provided by the Office of Student Affairs.

Electives

Beyond regularly offered core courses, students must take at least three elective courses, which are normally taken during junior and senior years. Under certain circumstances, underclassmen may be approved to take an elective. Normally, at least one elective is offered each of the last four semesters of a student’s program.

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